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Kevin Liles and Meek Mill want us to “Protect Black Art”

Photo: change.org

If you were old enough to grasp what was happening in pop culture in the early 2000s, you’ve likely heard about the “Hip-Hop police”, and if you were in the business then, you have probably been on the unit’s radar. Is it real? Yes, it is.

Photo: change.org

According to Kulture Hub, it is a part of the NYPD’s Enterprise Operations Units, also known as the “rap unit”, that monitors Hip-Hop shows across the city. And the New York Post published an internal memo regarding a Remy Ma concert at Irving Plaza in 2018.

In several ways that have played out in the world’s history, people of colour are often mishandled, misrepresented, misjudged, harassed, spied on, hated and murdered for who they are. If it isn’t for how we look, we are policed for what we say—in and out of music—and how we decide to express ourselves and heal.

Recently, more rappers’ lyrics have been on trial and used against them. So much so that JAY Z and other entertainers have joined forces to back the “Rap Music on Trial” bill, which passed a week after Young Thug’s animated song lyrics were used to paint the picture of his character in real life.

Yesterday at Summer Jam, a video played on the screen onstage with a personal message from Young Thug addressing his fans. If he wasn’t locked up, he might have performed at the legendary New Jersey music festival with his artist, Gunna.

Meek Mill also came back out after he performed alongside Lil Durk. He discussed the “Protect Black Art” petition and urged us to participate. I signed the petition early this morning. If you haven’t, please, join me and 13,000 others to start a meaningful journey toward protecting Black art.

We need 15,000 signatures to get a reaction from a decision-maker.


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