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Song of the Day: “War” by King Los featuring Marsha Ambrosius

Name: King Los
Representing: Baltimore, MD
Genre: Rap / Hip-Hop
For fans of: Drake, Fabolous, Kanye West
Single from: God, Money, War
Produced by: Anomaly & Da Internz
Song of the Day: April 21, 2015
Label(s): After Platinum / 88 Classic / RCA Records


While they’re a recurring topic, King Los’ “War” is not your usual generic rap song all about guns and drugs. The former Bad Boy rapper found a way to spread the gospel without force-feeding his message by tapping into consciousness on a relatable level for this track. The song starts off detailing a conversation with a friend who subscribes to the bottomless mentality of having limited options as a black man in America. This section explains why Los struggles with continuing in trying to even attempt to encode his message in a way worth being decoded rather than being sneered at as useless. The rapper details; he moves on in his effort after hearing a message: “God told me this movie will write itself / spread love, be wise, and let foolery fight itself.”

As the song goes on, it seems like it is talking more about a war on consciousness as the Baltimore rapper details it’s “the war for your soul, that’s what everyone’s ignoring.” As Los raps, “But who else could bring the hood out and tell them ‘When you let God in, you bring the good out’,” he shows there’s no one better than him to spread this message as he knows the struggles of his target audience. Without using forceful techniques or judging, King Los taps into a narrative that works as a voice for the hood and God simultaneously, while even utilizing a fast-paced Twista tone towards the end to execute it. If this song isn’t a golden example of versatility and the power of Hip-Hop, I don’t know what is.

Listen to the track via this link or the player below.

For more King Los, just click here.

Written by GRUNGECAKE

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