Grace Gaustad
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7@7: An evening playlist featuring Grace Gaustad and UNDRESSD

This 7@7 evening playlist consists of Vern Matz, LISA, Shan Vincent de Paul, Family of Things, and more.


Vern Matz – Void Dedication (Submission)

Vern Matz shares ‘Void Detection’, a relaxing Indie Rock song about the good and the bad of a relationship that almost feels like a lullaby. According to the band, it is “an acoustic tune to keep you warm in the rain.” Listen to the tranquil new record by students at Yale University.


Grace Gaustad – Photogenic (Submission)

Picking up the tempo a bit from the last record, New York City-based Grace Gaustad delivers profound vocals on ‘Photogenic’, a track about a breathtaking lover ghosting on her. The seventeen-year-old singer has written more than 300 songs to date, plays the guitar and the piano, and is ready for her breakthrough. With the help of her current numbers on social media, she’s not too far off.


LISA – Fumes (Submission)

Montreal, Canada singer-songwriter LISA made a song about chasing someone to the point of running on fumes. How exhausting? Her vocals are smooth and buttery like the spoon full you’d spread on your cornbread before consumption. Listen to the latest single from LISA’s forthcoming extended play. It has a rhythmic vocal technique that I like a lot over hazy reverb, which makes it memorable and fun.


UNDRESSD – Forever Young (Submission)

I’ll be super straight up with you. In my private moments, we tend to talk about mainstream albums; why we don’t enjoy every album cut from top artists today, and back then. Respectfully, Brooklyn music mogul and billionaire Jay-Z’s version of the Alphaville original doesn’t do it for me, sonically. So, to be as transparent and as fair as possible, when I read the titling for UNDRESSD’s song, I didn’t know what to expect, but I hoped for a better version because I cannot take distasteful remakes. Thankfully, it is better [to me]. Thus, I can share it with you.

We’ve been listening to a lot of amazing, old songs lately. By remaking them with our sound, we want to give the younger audiences a chance to rediscover these gems, the duo says.


Shan Vincent de Paul – Funeral featuring LA+CH (Submission)

With a visual, that reminds me of MIA edits, Toronto, Canada-based recording artist Shan Vincent de Paul delivers the official video for ‘Funeral’. In the short composition, the Sri-Lankan born artist raps about being making moves with his gang, handling business with a strong arm, and more.

Though its not a direct ode, the track was heavily inspired by Alexander McQueen. He was a visionary that embraced being an outcast in his field and use[s] that to his advantage. In a world [where] everyone is trying to fit in, McQueen was in his own lane and only competing with himself. The production had a dark and eerie quality to it that reminded me of McQueen’s work. The song is about me coming to terms with being an outcast in the rap world, and embracing that.


Family of Things – Harm (Submission)

“Loving you is going to do me harm, but I don’t give a damn” is the way to start a song if I didn’t know before. I love everything about the seeming eighties revival record performed by Canadian outfit Family of Things. Watch the video below for the Hamilton, Ontario, Canada band’s carefree unapologetic track. Everything about it feels good.


CAMARANO – Shadow Calling (Submission)

Back in 2017, Australian artist CAMARANO released an enchanting record called ‘Somebody Else’, that was from his then-forthcoming project. The Perth-based talent has been someone that I associate with a high level of quality from his compositions, songwriting and energy-producing. Different from his previous songs, ‘Shadow Calling’ sounds like a record perfect for synch licensing. Hear the newest infectious single by genre-bending musician now.


Don Diablo & Jessie J – Brave (Submission) (Bonus)

‘Brave’ is an upbeat mantra that we all need to incorporate into our daily lives and playlists. Whether it is a workout playlist, positive vibes playlist, Sunday morning playlist, or just your regular feel-good playlist, this song needs to be added. Something to be noted is that Jessie J is not featured in the video, it says “with” very clearly in the credits and within the music video. The video starts with Jessie J wearing white in a dark room, and we are introduced to Don Diablo, who is wearing all black and carrying some sort of light and electric current with him. Don Diablo lights up the night with light, electrical currents, and symbolic animal shapes, which seems to get Jessie J out of her room. We get to see different shots of them out and about in various settings. From the bedroom scene to the city views, to the snapshot in the cemetery, it feels as though there is a harmony between light and dark. The video seems to be full of symbolism, from the animals that get projected onto the buildings in the city, the camera pans to a photo on the dek in Jessie J’s room and to the logo on the leather jacket Don Diablo wears that Jessie J holds on to. You cannot ignore the cultural significance of the Calaveras (sugar skulls) which are projected into the night sky.

The fashion in the video comes from Don Diablo’s own merchandise collection. Throughout the video, you recognize his symbol. After Don Diablo and Jessie J hold hands and take off on their journey, the black leather jacket turns into a white hoodie jacket; there is also a moment when they switch jackets and coats. While Jessie J wears a floor-length fur coat and beanie, she holds Don Diablo’s leather jacket. You have to love and appreciate proper product placement in one’s own music video. (Coop)


GRUNGECAKE

Written by Richardine Bartee

It’s her unprejudiced love for people that’s taken her this far. Join Richardine on her journey as she writes history into existence, one article at a time. Richardine is a member of the Recording Academy/GRAMMYs.

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