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Extra Earworms: A weekend playlist for new artists

Photo: Courtesy of the artists
KRANTZ
Photo: Courtesy of the artists

FREEBASE – She Go featuring Niko Zipp (Submission)

As we have all seen over time, the current generation is obsessed with doing drugs—publicly. Back in the day, if someone had a habit, it wasn’t for the world to know. Personal life and professional images weren’t aligned. In the world of entertainment, it is a new idea. Evolving into a species that is obsessed with ‘oversharing’, that’s what gave birth to Southern Rap, or Trap music and its various subgenres.

One would wonder how a sound popularised in the heatwaves of the Southern states of the United States can make it all the way to the freezing landscape of Toronto, Canada. With the help of mass media and (now) social media, anything is possible. Most especially, influence.

When it comes to the music, it is polished, but it sounds like it is made by developing artists. We could have denied the submission, but we found the potential (based on flow) to be a good enough reason. We would suggest that when writing new music, they stick to storytelling—even if the same stays the same.

Overall, we liked the production, but we thought it could use more layers (vocally). Stream ‘She Go’ by FREEBASE featuring Niko Zipp below.


KRANTZ – Run Away With Me (Submission)

Escapism may be the most relatable human experience to date. How many of us can say that we’ve never wanted to be elsewhere? When you close your eyes, you might envision yourself in a new city. Most of the time, you are alone but you feel a sense of relief. Running anyway isn’t an option for many—especially if you are underage but it is a thought.

It isn’t a fairytale for the artist. Jeffrey Krantz left Iowa to make his dream a reality. When your mind, heart and soul are connected, you can tell if you are meant to be in a specific space and time. KRANTZ knew he had to make a change. If you can identify with that, ‘Run Away With Me’ is for you.

KRANTZ, a Nashville, Tennesse-based band released the lyric video for a song about it earlier in the year. We didn’t get to cover that, so we are sharing the official video for it now below.


$ad Alpha – KING featuring Sweeney (Submission)

Repetitive on the hook like most music in the genre, Canadian recording artists $ad Alpha and Sweeney make yet another bombastic call-and-response track meant to be played at the club. Who doesn’t want to feel like royalty? They’ve got the relatable part down. We’d like to see how the two progress in the future. When they submitted the record, they didn’t have much information available except: ‘A new entry in braggadocio’. Listen to the record below. Let us know if you think it is a good description.


ZO MO & Roxii – Shadows (Submission)

We think the frame of the track is wonderful—production wise. However, we believe that the lead vocals could use some work (better alignment, arrangement and energy). To people with trained ears, it takes away from what she’s saying in the music. Reminiscent of Busta Rhymes’ repetitve use of ‘dangerous’ in the classic track of the same song from his solo sophomore 1997 album: When Disaster Strikes, what appears to be male vocals does the same thing over the alluring Electronic beat.


Elwood – Alive (Submission)

From the start of the record, the levels sound too loud. We had to turn down the volume to enjoy ‘Alive’. There’s harmonizing that isn’t the best addition. However, the messaging behind what the Long Island rapper says is inspiring. To finally arrive is a wonderful feeling. On the sand, next to the waves, Elwood pours out his heart on the Soul-sampled production. Personally, we would like to hear him get more comfortable with lyrical delivery. He isn’t ‘performing’ the vocals. It’s monotonous.


Corina Corina – BAR$ (Submission)

How authentic are the words of Corina Corina’s new music? Most people hold down regular gigs to pay their rent and make ends meet before investing in their careers. Originally from Oakland, the Brooklyn, New York-based musician draws from personal experiences. She works at a bar. For artists, day jobs aren’t the dream but it is necessary. Unfortunately, it takes vital time from your creative nature. As a result for Corina Corina, she has a love-hate relationship with her day job. We think aspiring artists will be able to identify with the rawness of ‘BAR$’. Furthermore, we think she has what it takes to crossover, but we think there’s room to tweak her vocal pitch. Check out the young singer-songwriters’ new visual below.


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