Next up: Compton Dibi

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Get to know Compton Dibi.

 

S

o, when you think of the West Coast (musically), what comes to mind? More specifically, when you think of the Compton area of Los Angeles, what do you see? For me, instantly, I think of Dr. Dre, Eazy-E, and the NWA era! Then, I think about artists like B.G. Knocc Out, Michel’le and DJ Quik! Next, Guerilla Black, Hot Dollar, Problem, The Game, and of course Kendrick Lamar come to mind.

What do all of these artists have in common besides geographical origins? While there is diversity amongst the range of artists I mentioned, they all carry a West Coast-heavy trend of brash lyrics with prevalent street ties to the B’s and C’s. Even Kendrick Lamar, whose been deemed the King of the West, has a different perspective and sound than what LA is used to, still, has those same ties and knots.

Compton Dibi

Photo: Courtesy of the artist

While the lifestyles are represented in the music, being from Southern California myself, I know there’s a huge following and market of musicians and artists that while growing up in the same areas and situations, choose to represent an alternate route or took a different approach to the music. They may speak on similar topics. However, their image and perspective don’t follow the norm. Enter Compton Dibi, a smooth singer-songwriter who focuses on the melodic tunes of his voice and signature style of writing. When asked to give an explanation, he replied. He gave an unexpected, but a relatable answer.

“I was a fan of Ted DiBiase. I shortened the name,” Compton Dibi said.

Some of Dibi’s accomplishments include opening for the likes of BJ the Chicago Kid and fellow Los Angeles R&B/Pop artist Eric Bellinger. He also played at SOL on June 9 in Carson, California. He opened for Sammie. Dibi is currently pushing his album titled “PCH,” which stands for Pacific Coast Highway. His imprint is called Fly Tide Music Group, which is spot on in correlation to his sound and wave. The PCH project starts off right with the “Intro” record featuring JGo entitled, “Freeway.” The song is relatable. It touches on dilemmas we’ve all encountered a time or two.

Ever been on your way home, and you receive a risque photo with words questioning your whereabouts? Instantly, we become one-tracked minded; concerned with reaching to the sender. The only thing standing in our way, besides time and traffic, is the freeway.

The album features JGo, Ghrimm, KO, and Young Rook, who is now on Ab-Soul’s YMF Tour. Certainly, Compton Dibi is making a splash. Besides the “Intro” record, I’m also a fan of the track “Ryder,” which takes a unique spin on Fabolous’s “Can’t Deny It” that’s sure to have Nate Dogg smiling down upon him. Also, “All Night” is a favorite of mine.

By now, you should know that beat selection is important to me, and once again, the producer prevails. Then, there’s the outro. The skilled artist saved something for last with “I’m On Now.”

There’s a fitting music video featuring a guy dancing that should’ve gone viral by now. The country-looking white guy grooves as if he is at one with his inner swag. It is comical. I love how it shows that music can transcend race, age, genre and every other stereotype.

Honestly, “PCH” is the type of project you can play from beginning to end, but that’s not all. I also enjoy Compton Dibi’s older music. Specifically, a track called, “Don’t Doubt It” and another record “Like Kanye,” which somehow managed to make its way to Super Bowl-winning wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders’ house, debuting the February Yeezy release for Houston’s Stitch and Trace sneaker store and boutique.



I’m like: Damn, he seems to be everywhere! I am a fan of his work and his drive. At his current success rate, he’s putting himself in place to truly end up to be Compton’s new Million Dollar Man.


GrungeCake

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